Acknowledgements

The South Carolina Clinical an d Translational Research Institute (SCTR)

SCTR_Logo The SCTR Institute was established in 2006 in response to the NIH CTSA Program, a Roadmap Initiative funded by the National Center for Research Resources, aimed at transforming approaches to research and discovery implementation.  The main thrust of the CTSA Program is to catalyze the development of inter-disciplinary research initiatives to accelerate the translation of discoveries into improved therapies and clinical practice while breaking down programmatic boundaries.  SCTR received NCRR funding in July 2009.  SCTR is comprised of 11 overall programs including: the SUCCESS Center (Research Support and Navigation Services); the Clinical & Translational Research Center (formerly the GCRC); Biomedical Informatics Program; Design, Biostatistics, Epidemiology & Clinical Research Ethics Program; Regulatory Knowledge & Support Program; Pilot Projects Program; Novel Clinical & Translational Methodologies Program; Translational Technologies & Resources Program; Community Engagement & Research Program; and the Education & Training Program.  SCTR has robust statewide collaborations with affiliate members including the University of South Carolina, Health Sciences South Carolina, Clemson University, Greenwood Genetics Center, South Carolina Research Authority, and the Charleston VA Medical Center.

The SCTR Institute’s vision
is to improve health outcomes and quality of life for the population of South Carolina through discoveries translated into evidence-based practice. SCTR serves as the catalyst for changing the culture of biomedical research, facilitating sharing of resources and expertise, and streamlining research-related processes to bring about large-scale, change in the clinical and translational research efforts in South Carolina.

Acknowledgment of NIH Funding on Publications/Projects


SCTR_Grant_Number All publications/projects resulting from the utilization of any SCTR Institute resources are required to credit the CTSA grant.
Please acknowledge and cite SCTR’s NIH grant number UL1 RR029882 (NCRR) and UL1 TR000062 (NCATS) for any research, publications, consultations, events, or activities supported by SCTR institute

Grant Citation Language

For researchers other than KL2 Scholars or TL1 Trainees, the language is:
This publication [or project] was supported by the South Carolina Clinical & Translational Research (SCTR) Institute, with an academic home at the Medical University of South Carolina, NIH/NCRR Grant number UL1 RR029882. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH or NCRR.

KL2 Scholars should cite grant KL2 RR029880, as follows: This publication [or project] was supported by the South Carolina Clinical & Translational Research (SCTR) Institute, with an academic home at the Medical University of South Carolina, NIH/NCRR Grant number UL1 RR029880. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH or NCRR.

TL1 should cite grant TL1 RR029881, as follows: This publication [or project] was supported by the South Carolina Clinical & Translational Research (SCTR) Institute, with an academic home at the Medical University of South Carolina, NIH/NCRR Grant number UL1 RR029881. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH or NCRR.

The South Eastern Virtual Institute for Health Equity & Wellness (SE View)


SE_View_Logo MUSC announced the establishment of a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Defense to develop educational and outreach programs and conduct community-based research on health disparities.


This three-year, $12.7 million award was made possible by a Congressional earmark secured by U.S. Rep. James E. Clyburn to address the high rates of disease occurrence, disability and mortality in rural, low-income or minority communities.


“In South Carolina, we have many communities that are struggling with very high rates of diseases such as hypertension, obesity and diabetes,” Clyburn said. “We think of these conditions as problems among older people, but the truth of the matter is that many of these illnesses are present in young people of military age.”

Under this agreement, 14 MUSC investigators will undertake projects that raise public awareness, such as community leaders’ institutes, to develop services to meet health needs, and conduct research on the program’s effectiveness. Particular focus will be directed toward engaging young people in prevention programs.


MUSC Chief of Staff Sabra Slaughter, Ph.D., will lead MUSC’s efforts. “This award will allow us to address some of the most fundamental differences in health status within South Carolina and the Southeastern region,” stated Slaughter. “This has been a priority for the Medical University for many years, but we have lacked the resources to develop a comprehensive approach to the problem.”


MUSC President Ray Greenberg, M.D., Ph.D., said some of the areas of the state with the highest illness and death rates also have the lowest numbers of primary care and specialty physicians. “In stroke care, we already have demonstrated that we can reach out to these communities using telemedicine to allow specialists at the Medical University to consult with patients and their physicians in rural areas.”

MUSC neurologists led by Robert Adams, M.D., have demonstrated that stroke care can be delivered in some of the smallest towns using an Internet-based consultation system. “Telemedicine is particularly well suited for high risk populations resulting in interventions and treatments being administered more efficiently resulting in better health outcomes,” said Adams, MUSC Stroke Center director.

MUSC College of Nursing

MUSC_CON_Logo Based in the College of Nursing, CCHP officially received “center status” in February 2008.  CCHP was developed to address the need for the coordination and linking of resources for MUSC-community partnerships and to promote mechanisms to enhance the quality and sustainability of these partnerships and their products.   Planned activities focused on strengthening capacity and resources for existing and potential academic-community partnerships, stimulating new research discoveries through community based participatory research, and facilitating the translation and adoption of new research findings into community settings.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation provided partial funding for CCHP. CCHP investigators have received funding from NINR, NCI, NHLBI, CDC, AHRQ, NLM, Duke Endowment, SCTR, and others to conduct research and health promotion initiatives in communities in South Carolina and Georgia. Today, CCHP has merged with the SCTR Community Engagement Program to form SCTR Center for Community Health Partnerships (SCTR/CCHP), which is currently housed in the College of Nursing.